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Army Chief Warrant Officer 4

W-4 Warrant Officer, U.S. Army
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How to get promoted to Chief Warrant Officer 4 History of the Army Chief Warrant Officer 4 Rank

A Chief Warrant Officer 4 is a Warrant Officer in the United States Army at DoD paygrade W-4.

The ranks of Chief Warrant Officer 2, Chief Warrant Officer 3, and Chief Warrant Officer 4 share much of their history with the rank of Warrant Officer, finding its beginnings in the late 1890’s with the precursor to the Warrant Officer rank.

With the creation of the ranks of Warrant Officer, Junior Grade and Chief Warrant Officer in 1941, the foundation for the future rank of Chief Warrant Officer 2 was laid.

The ranks of Chief Warrant Officer 3 and Chief Warrant Officer 4 did not enter into the organization until after the end of World War II.

Yet, by 1949, legislation had provided for four levels of Warrant Officer: Warrant Officer, Junior Grade, and Chief Warrant Officer, who could hold the grade of W-2 through W-4.

By 1954, the Army had further delineated the ranks of the Warrant Officer Corps with the publication and passing into law by Congress of the Warrant Officer Act. This legislation provided for four different grades of Warrant Officer: Warrant Officer 1, Chief Warrant Officer 2, Chief Warrant Officer 3, and Chief Warrant Officer 4.

These Chief Warrant Officer ranks have remained in use in the same grade and capacity in the US Army until modern times.

Want to learn more? Read about the Army's Chief Warrant Officer 4 rank on Military-Ranks.org.


History of the Army

The Army is the oldest and most senior among the branches. The Army's heritage is traced back to the Revolutionary War, when each State of the Union had its own Army, lended to the command of General George Washington. Almost 250 years have passed, but the organizational structure and naming is largely the same. The Army is still divided into Divisions, Brigades, Regiments, Battalions, Companies, and Platoons.